Porno No! Google Chrome Ad Blocker

Ad Block

The Wall Street Journal has released a story from an anonymous source who has stated that Google is not only entering the Ad Block market place but will be enabling their Ad Blocker in Google Chrome as default.

Google Chrome has an estimated 53% market share of all online traffic, which will give this new Ad blocker huge market reach straight from release. It also has the potential to have a devastating effect on affiliates and affiliate marketing.

According to this anonymous source the new Google Chrome Ad Block will focus on adverts that the Coalition for Better Ads considers as annoying and distracting for users, such as pop-ups, pre-load landing pages, pages with more than 30% ad density, flashing animations and auto-playing ads with audio, most of which are very popular advertising methods in the porn industry.

Pop ups/unders are a very popular monetisation method as well as a traffic acquisition method in the porn industry. If advertisers and publishers were to lose the 53% market share Google Chrome commands it would create huge financial loss throughout the industry.

Advertising networks

If Google, as stated by the source, was to block popups/unders in the Chrome browser then the effect on advertising networks could be fatal. Advertising networks, such as popads.net and popcash.net, whose focus is solely on this style of advertising, would see a vast negative financial impact, possibly to the brink of bankruptcy, due to the huge drop in traffic.

Exoclick.com is the fourth largest global advertising network, as ranked by W3Techs, with a reach of 125+ billion ad impressions per month – of which a generous 18% are popunders (as stated by the Exoclick Media Kit). That puts a massive 22.5+ billion popunders per month at risk of being blocked by Google Chrome just for Exoclick alone.

Add all of the popunders from all of the adult advertising networks together and, as you can imagine, the volume is huge and the financial implications vast.

Porn tubes and affiliate sites

Popunders have long been a favoured method of monetisation for porn affiliate sites so this ad block would cause serious financial loss for these porn tubes and other affiliate sites. Losing 50%+ of popunder revenue is enough to cause huge financial loss for most affiliate sites as profit margins on traffic is already at an all-time low with the influx of free porn.

TubeCoporate.com report that they have 24 million desktop pops and 32 mobile pops a week, making them one of the biggest porn networks with the most to lose.

Tube Coporate Advertising

How would most affiliate sites cope with such a large loss in their advertising revenue? It may be some time before this ad blocker comes to market but it is worth affiliates thinking about coping mechanisms and replacing lost revenue, should popunders be affected.

Other ad formats

It is not just the popunders that could be affected by this latest news. The Coalition for Better Ads states that mobile pages with more than 30% ad density, flashing animations, poststitial ads that require a countdown to dismiss, full-screen rollover ads, large sticky ads and auto-playing videos with sound are “least preferred”.

It is unclear how the ad block would affect sites using the advertising methods above. Would they also be blocked? Could mobile pages with more than 30% ad density have all adverts blocked until they remove adverts bringing them under the 30% guidelines? There is much more detail and clarification required from Google before acting.

Summary: how might the ad block affect porn sites?

  • Popunders blocked by Chrome users, loss of revenue and traffic
  • Possible block on floater ads on mobile pages
  • Possible effect on mobile pages with more than 30% ad density
  • Possible effect on auto-playing ads with audio – Webcam iframe adverts with sound etc possibly blocked?

A popular quote in the adult affiliate arena is “adapt or die” and I fear many would struggle to adapt should this anonymous source prove to be correct.

Keep an eye out for official updates from Google at next month’s I/O developer conference and in the news.

 

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